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, south america as well. so stand by. stay with us for complete coverage. senator john mccain told me just a little while ago even if a fiscal cliff deal is done, the battle between the white house and congressional republicans is far from over. >> i think there's going to be a whole new field of battle when the debt ceiling rolls around. >> all right. let's dig a little bit deeper with ryan lizza. he's washington correspondent for the new yorker magazine. also ali velshi our chief correspondent is joining us. deal or no deal? >> looks like from what dana is reporting, that a deal is in sight. republicans are saying they're going to have a vote tonight. looks like a deal is done. >> with the senate. >> we don't know what the house will do. and the last time john boehner tried to put something on the floor, his caucus rebelled. he'd have to let the house vote its will. >> but you agree if the president of the united states supports it, most of the house democrats will support it. so you don't need a majority of the republicans, you need a few republicans to get to that magic number of 218.
of america hears the great things about south carolina. [applause] >> thank you, tim. to our conservative rock star for the state of south carolina and our conservative rock star for the country and the heritage foundation, center jim -- senator jim demint. >> governor, when you say there will never be anyone like me, most of washington says, thank goodness. [laughter] i am excited about what is going on today. one of the few things i am worried about what i was considering leaving the senate was who would replace me. i knew that governor haley would put someone in this seat that we would be proud of and continue to stand for those principles of freedom and opportunity. governor, thank you for your faithfulness to our cause and your good judgment. tim, i could not be happier today. i can walk away from the senate and knowing that someone is better than i am that will carry the voice of conservatism to the whole country in a way that i could not do. i will keep working with that cause, but you inspired me since i heard you speak in public. our country needs those positive and optimistic v
. we have a great group who truly understands we are here to represent the great state of south carolina and the citizens of america, and i thank them all for their friendship. finally, i'd like to thank all of my colleagues here in the house. we may not always agree on things, but we are here for a reason, to try and make this nation better. as i prepare to move to the united states senate, it is that belief that makes me incredibly optimistic about our future. the battles of today will in the future be seen as a positive turning point for our nation where we got our fiscal house back in order and revitalized the american dream for our children and our grandchildren. i look forward to continuing to serve the res. dents -- residents of south carolina, some of the most passionate people in our nation, and i will never forget my time here in the people's house where we worked every single day to build a brighter future for our nation. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess until 10:00 a.m. you and also on our w
in chicago health care in our lifetimes. sheila line was born and raised on the south side of chicago, one of three children of irish immigrants who met in america. she attended little flower elementary school. she joined the sisters of mercy in 1953. she earned her master's degree in psychiatric nursing from st. xavier college and an m.b.a. from the university of chicago and served three years as assistant professor at the university of iowa. in 1976 she became mercy hospital's president and c.e.o. in 1991 mayor richard m. daily daily -- daly appointed her health commissioner. the department's responsibilities ran the gamut from inspecting restaurants to monitoring and controlling epidemic and protecting the public against the spread of infectious disease. its clinics received a million patient vichts a year and served as a family doctor to more chicagoans than any other entity. h.i.v. and aids were taking a toll on the city and nation, gay and lesbian groups protested her appointment strongly, fearing she would allow catholic church policies to dictate public health decisions. sister she
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4